What is Your Most Beloved Book?

There are several childhood books in my library that are in the I’ll-never-part-with category, except maybe to pass on to grand-children. One of them is Come to Storyland with pages missing and others as brittle as autumn leaves.

beloved book

Here is blogger friend and author Susan Nicholls’ story about her favorite. (Click to view more illustrations and the rest of her story.)  Do you have a beloved book or books?

S.K. Nicholls

I have an old copy of Uncle Wiggily in the Countryby Howard R. Garis. The copyrights are 1916 and 1940. The title is worn, the book is held together with tape. Various children have colored its yellowed, torn pages. The book was first purchased by my grandma to read to my aunt and my mother. They were born in 1940 and 1942 respectively.

Grandmother and Uncle Wiggly Grandmother Nicholls and Uncle Wiggily

Then, my mother read it to me and my two sisters, one older, one younger. We used to cuddle in the center of my sister’s twin bed and listen as she read each chapter. We would embrace under the covers protecting each other and hiding from the tiddlewink, an evil but sympathetic creature with claws and sharp teeth who lived in any body of water from swamps and ponds to bathtubs and washtubs. My mother died when I was eight, and…

View original post 422 more words

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “What is Your Most Beloved Book?

  1. My first favorite book was, “Black Beauty.” I wanted a horse soooo badly and especially Black Beauty, who’d been abused. I’ve beem adopting and caring for abused and homeless cats and dogs ever since. Wish I had room for a horse.

    Like

    1. Thank you, Joan, for your practical illustration of the power of books to transform. In your case, adopting and caring for abused pets. What a great way to start the conversation on this topic.

      Like

  2. My all-time favorite book from childhood was anything and everything HARRIET THE SPY. My all-time favorite book as an adult is ATLAS SHRUGGED (I respect, but don’t share Ayn Rand’s political and/or spiritual views, but the actual storyline of Atlas Shrugged is extremely riveting).

    Like

  3. I missed Harriet the Spy but am familiar with Atlas Shrugged, a dystopian novel. Like you, I don’t share Ayn Rand’s world views, but recognize it as a classic of 20th Century American literature. Interestingly, it was published in the late 1950s but with a plot set in 2016 with the United States in a sustained economic depression.

    Thanks for commenting, Laurie. Now over to Tuesdays with Laurie! (Readers: Just click on Laurie’s photo and you’ll find the link to her blog where you can read her witty posting today!)

    Like

  4. I missed Harriet the Spy but am familiar with Atlas Shrugged, a dystopian novel. Like you, I don’t share Ayn Rand’s world views, but recognize it as a classic of 20th Century American literature. Interestingly, it was published in the late 1950s but with a plot set in 2016 with the United States in a sustained economic depression.

    Thanks for commenting, Laurie. Now over to Tuesdays with Laurie! Here’s the link to Laurie’s witty post today: http://tuesdayswithlaurie.com/

    Like

Thank You for Leaving a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s